Parents


What about tweens and teens?

More than ever before, we are a society that is constantly "plugged in and turned on". With the miniaturization of electronics it is possible to take our music and our games with us. Listening habits have changed and it is changing how we communicate with each other. Marcia Epstein, Professor in the Faculty of Communication and Culture, at the University of Calgary, has explored the implications of too much noise and has found that the use of personal music players can create as sense of isolation which may lead to difficulties with interpersonal communication. Children who routinely use personal music players may have "fewer opportunities to develop habitual skills like cooperation and might be less able to deal effectively with situations where they have to act as a group" (U Magazine, Vol. 3, No. 3).

Teens and tweens are a challenging group to reach as they are often caught up in trying to become more independent and find out where they fit in socially. Many love music and use personal music players for extended periods of time in ways that we have not seen before, especially since they can download literally hundreds of hours of music and can keep in touch with their friend via text messaging. They also think they are invincible and that nothing will ever happen to their ears. The earbuds they use fit deep into the ears, but this creates a small space in which the sound pressure can rise creating a greater volume than if the sound were coming from a speaker sitting on a nearby table.

One study found that there is a 'disconnect' that teens have when it comes to music and the fact that loud music can permanently damage their hearing. A web-based study designed by the researchers of Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, and the Harvard School of Public Health was posted on MTV.com for three days. Just over 9,600 teens completed the survey. It was found that 61% of young people attending concerts, and 43% of those who gone to a club, experienced tinnitus, or ringing in the ears following the noise exposure to loud music. Only 11% of respondents had used protective ear plugs. While these statistics may seem disheartening, there was some good news. Sixty-six percent said they could be motivated to use hearing protection if there were more aware of the potential for permanent hearing loss.

What about Tweens and Teens?
Noisy Toys: Turning Down the Volume can make a Difference
There is no escaping it. The world of sound surrounds us and while many sounds bring comfort, sometimes sound can be a bit overwhelming, especially when there are many things going on at once, like the television, conversation, noisy toys, etc.
Noisy Toys: What about Tweens and Teens?
More than ever before, we are a society that is constantly "plugged in and turned on". With the miniaturization of electronics it is possible to take our music and our games with us.